ATHLETICS

How do athletics comply with Title IX?

In general, Title IX impacts the effective accommodation of interests and abilities in sports, the proportionality of financial assistance available to female and male student-athletes, and the treatment of student-athletes regarding the equivalency of athletic benefits and opportunities. Although Title IX was not created as a means to effect equitable treatment in athletics, the law has had a profound effect on sports and is often thought of in the context of athletics.

 

What about participation, scholarships, and programs?

With respect to participation, schools must meet one of the following three tests: a) Provide participation opportunities for female and male students that are substantially proportionate to their respective rates of enrollment; b) Demonstrate a continual practice of program expansion for the underrepresented sex; or c) Fully and effectively accommodate the interests and abilities of the underrepresented sex. This is often referred to as the “three-prong test.”

With respect to scholarships, Title IX requires that female and male student-athletes receive athletics scholarship dollars proportional to their participation.

In addition, Title IX requires equivalent treatment of female and male student-athletes in the provisions of: (a) equipment and supplies; (b) scheduling of games and practice times; (c) travel and daily allowance/per diem; (d) access to tutoring; (e) coaching, (f) locker rooms, practice and competitive facilities; (g) medical and training facilities and services; (h) housing and dining facilities and services; (i) publicity and promotions; (j) support services and (k) recruitment of student-athletes.  This is often referred to as the Title IX athletics "laundry list."

Title IX compliance in athletics is assessed through a total program comparison (the entire men’s program compared to the entire women’s program).  Assessment occurs regularly through coordinated effort between BYU's Title IX Office and BYU Athletics administration.

 

Does Title IX require male athletic opportunities be cut?

No. The law requires that athletic programs meet the interests and abilities of each gender equitably, and there are many ways a school can accomplish this. Title IX does not require reductions in opportunities for male student-athletes; instead it is about equal opportunity and quality of treatment of student athletes. Title IX compliance in athletics is assessed through a total program comparison (the entire men’s program compared to the entire women’s program) and BYU works diligently to ensure such compliance.